Asian Americans are more open to Democrats than the rest of the U.S.

Republicans make inroads with a key group of voters: Asian Americans. About 70 percent of the Asian Americans in the country identify with one of three parties: the Democratic White House, Republican White House,…

Asian Americans are more open to Democrats than the rest of the U.S.

Republicans make inroads with a key group of voters: Asian Americans.

About 70 percent of the Asian Americans in the country identify with one of three parties: the Democratic White House, Republican White House, or Democratic White House plus minority party.

Democrats are making gains among Asian Americans despite not performing as well nationally.

On average, Asian Americans have about a 4 point edge over their Democratic White House counterparts.

Democrats now have an edge of 1 point and a half-point edge over Republicans.

“The demographic is the best barometer for the direction of the Democratic Party in the U.S. and the United States,” said Richard Kim, an associate professor of Asian American and Asian diaspora studies at Columbia Law School.

“If you are a Democrat, you will continue to attract Asian Americans and Asian voters; if they are going to switch parties, you will have a problem.”

To understand why Asian Americans are more open to Democrats, it’s important to take a step back to understand the state of the American electorate in 2017.

“We know that the percentage of Asian Americans voting is now the highest it has ever been in the 20 years that the General Social Survey has been conducted,” said Benjamin Page, an associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan who studies racial and ethnic relations.

“It’s not necessarily surprising that we have a high number of Asian voters being registered. We have a large-scale population of Asian Americans who have been living in the U.S. for over half a century. They have been voting at least as long as most of us have been alive.”

The General Social Survey, a panel survey carried out by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, has conducted the most comprehensive survey of the non-institutionalized population in America since the late 1940s.

On average, about one out of every three adults now identifies as Asian American, about the same as the U.S. population.

The survey is part of the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and has been conducted since 1980. It asks about voting intentions and attitudes on a wide range of issues.

What makes the study so revealing in 2017 is that Asian Americans are as likely to vote as the rest of the U.S. population, and their voting intentions show they

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