California Desalinization Plant to be built in part with federal funds

California Coastal Commission OKs desalination plant in Orange County A new state-of-the-art desalination plant that can save the U.S. and California millions of dollars is expected to become operational in 2014. The Central Coast…

California Desalinization Plant to be built in part with federal funds

California Coastal Commission OKs desalination plant in Orange County

A new state-of-the-art desalination plant that can save the U.S. and California millions of dollars is expected to become operational in 2014.

The Central Coast Regional Water Board on Wednesday approved the California Desalinization Plant, which will connect several facilities in Orange County on the coastline and bring water to southern California.

The facility will be operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

“This is a big win for the state and a big win for me personally, and I think it’s a major milestone for the Coastal Division,” said Deputy State Resources Officer Paul Schmittler, who heads the state division’s water resources program. The state division has responsibility for administering water to the region.

The plant will produce 250,000 acre-feet of water, or equal to about 5 percent of the current supply by itself, the water board said.

The board approved an annual service rate of about $10 million. That includes $2 million annually to operate the plant, with a cost-share program for the board of $2 million.

The board will take its first official action on the plant today.

It will then take at least two months to get all approvals from state agencies, including the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

“The plant is going to be a great boon for Orange County, and California as a whole,” Schmittler said.

The plant is being built in part with federal funds, with the state using about $2 million in state money for the project.

The board also approved the construction of a $5.1 million desalination building in San Juan Capistrano, a building that will be at least 12 stories.

The board also approved the sale of a portion of the coastal water district’s coastal lands, and a $50,000 grant to the Orange County Water District to help the district pay for the coastal lands acquisition.

The Central Coast Regional Water Board is a five-member board, including three appointed citizens who are members of the water board, three appointed coastal zone officials and the mayor of Long Beach.

Coastal Division Director Robert Haskins said the construction of the plant will create

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