CDC Announces New Vaccination Schedule for Children

COVID-19 vaccinations for young children now expected to start later than previously planned, due to widespread school closures due to the virus. In the past, young children were required to provide consent for vaccinations…

CDC Announces New Vaccination Schedule for Children

COVID-19 vaccinations for young children now expected to start later than previously planned, due to widespread school closures due to the virus.

In the past, young children were required to provide consent for vaccinations from a parent or guardian. That rule has been relaxed to make it easier for parents to administer vaccinations.

The vaccine schedule for young children is expected to be the same as for adults:

The vaccines with the least known long-term risks include the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, the chickenpox, varicella vaccine and the influenza vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“We are doing this to make it easier for parents to get their children vaccinated when they are sick or vulnerable and do not have time to travel to the doctor’s office,” Dr. Anne Schuchat, the director of the CDC Immunization Services, said in a statement. The new vaccination schedule, which should start on or after July 21, also makes it easier for parents to get their children vaccinated.

The vaccine is now being given to children aged 11 months through 8 years, up to four times, according to the CDC.

The vaccine schedule for children aged 12 months through 17 months is unchanged.

There’s a wide range of vaccines that doctors need to consider when deciding whether to administer a vaccine for an under-3-year-old, according to the CDC. The CDC recommends a child’s vaccination record include: the number of days a child has been up to date, the age at which the child is being started on the vaccine, the vaccination that brought the child’s immunity up to date, whether the child is currently getting a new vaccine, whether other vaccines given in the past have been unsuccessful, the child’s previous history of vaccine reactions and any side effects experienced in the past.

Parents should keep copies of their immunization records when a doctor administers a new vaccine. The records should be kept for three years and be reviewed periodically to ensure a child’s immunity is up to date.

Parents should review vaccination records for their children annually, beginning at 12 months of age to ensure the child has received all needed vaccines, according to the CDC.

For more information on the CDC’s Vaccines

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