High Bacteria Warning Beaches in Los Angeles County

All Los Angeles County beaches placed under high bacteria warning due to rain, bacteria are spreading, health officials say This story has been updated. A total of 38 beaches are under a high bacteria…

High Bacteria Warning Beaches in Los Angeles County

All Los Angeles County beaches placed under high bacteria warning due to rain, bacteria are spreading, health officials say

This story has been updated.

A total of 38 beaches are under a high bacteria warning in Los Angeles County until Tuesday morning due to rain, officials said.

At least 20 of those beaches are in the county’s Inland Empire.

“As of 8 a.m. Monday, there are now 34 beaches in the Inland Empire that are under a health advisory. This includes at least one in each of the following counties: San Bernardino, Riverside, Orange, San Diego, Ventura, Santa Barbara and Santa Diego/Los Angeles,” Los Angeles County Department of Public Health spokesman Jonathan Gordon said in an email.

The high bacteria levels are due to rain, the agency said in an advisory.

Officials said the rainfall and runoff from storm-water pipes, sewage systems, septic systems and toilets is resulting in bacteria growth in public spaces.

“We want to remind the community that bacteria can live for years in septic systems and in bathrooms and kitchens if they are not cleaned out properly,” Department of Public Health spokesman Jonathan Gordon said.

“Bacteria can be transferred to the water supply through rainwater runoffs from storm drains and sewer systems.”

In addition, officials said there are 10 more high bacteria warning beaches in San Bernardino County. Those beaches are at Harbor Regional Park, Chino Hills Regional Park, Big Bear Lake Regional Park, Sierra Blanca Regional Park, Palm Desert Regional Park, and Mount San Antonio Regional Park.

LASD said to avoid visiting any beaches under the high bacteria advisory.

“While visiting these beaches, check to see if any warning signs are posted. And follow us on social media to get all the latest information on beaches open and closed, as well as other beach advisories,” LASD said on its Facebook page.

The high bacteria levels are due to rain, the agency said in an advisory.

Officials said the rainfall and runoff from storm-water pipes, sewage systems, septic systems and toilets is resulting in bacteria growth in public spaces.

“We want to remind the community that bacteria can live for years in septic systems and in bathrooms and kitchens if they are not cleaned out properly,” Department of Public Health spokesman Jonathan Gordon said.

“Bacteria

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