Leticia de León refuses to sign a letter condemning police violence

City Council censures De León, Cedillo, Martinez after police clear out demonstrators in march over gun control Share this: San Antonio City Council member, Leticia de León discusses the march with her daughter Angelica,…

Leticia de León refuses to sign a letter condemning police violence

City Council censures De León, Cedillo, Martinez after police clear out demonstrators in march over gun control

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San Antonio City Council member, Leticia de León discusses the march with her daughter Angelica, as demonstrators carry signs in support of her family during a protest in San Antonio, Texas, August 31, 2016. (San Antonio Express-News/Steve González/Special for USA TODAY)

San Antonio City Council member Leticia de León was not happy when she saw police charging at the crowd of people who gathered to express their views. She had her own views about the protest, and that had nothing to do with the police.

She, like many others in San Antonio, was upset that President Trump was elected.

Now, Councilwoman de León has come under fire for refusing to sign a statement condemning the police violence that occurred during a recent march by some 400 people downtown. While the statement, which is included in the report she released Monday night, was not available before the news media picked up on it, the councilwoman also says that she did not want to sign a letter which would have been sent to President Trump.

San Antonio City Council member Leticia DeLeón speaks while surrounded by demonstrators during a protest in San Antonio, Texas, August 31, 2016. (San Antonio Express-News/Steve González/Special for USA TODAY)

De León says she never intended to speak out against police violence, and that her decision not to sign the letter was because she was not willing to sign an attack on an ally, even if she disagreed with him.

In her report of the March Against Guns, De León noted that the protest began with speakers who said “no more mass shootings in the United States.”

“I was listening but said nothing and then saw the police charging the crowd. It was an ugly sight. I felt a need to speak for myself, and I did,” De León wrote.

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