Los Angeles International Airport’s new security checkpoints aren’t foolproof

12,000 suspected fentanyl pills found in candy boxes at LAX security checkpoint in December. An international manhunt for a suspected killer who allegedly delivered nearly 12,000 fentanyl capsules to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)…

Los Angeles International Airport’s new security checkpoints aren’t foolproof

12,000 suspected fentanyl pills found in candy boxes at LAX security checkpoint in December.

An international manhunt for a suspected killer who allegedly delivered nearly 12,000 fentanyl capsules to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) security checkpoints.

This is an edited transcript of an investigative report by the Center for Investigative Reporting and ProPublica, based on interviews with former law enforcement agents, private security guards, federal officers, and former TSA and Secret Service officers.

In a massive public works project, LAX took $250,000 from the general public to rebuild a security checkpoint into a two-level checkpoint that includes a new digital surveillance camera and a more secure metal detector in the screening area.

The new checkpoint, now in its fourth year, comes with a $6.7 million price tag. The checkpoint has not yet been tested by a state or federal official and TSA still wants to know what the checkpoint is actually capable of doing.

A Los Angeles County sheriff’s spokesman says they are doing their due diligence while they are under the FAA’s jurisdiction—but TSA said it isn’t in the clear.

I saw the new checkpoint and it’s an improvement over the old one. It’s the first two-level checkpoint in L.A., and it has security cameras throughout the checkpoint like a TSA checkpoint, but the security there was not as good.

The new checkpoints were designed with a new digital video camera, which is said to make it easier to recognize and identify those who have tampered with the program. But at the same time, it’s not clear how they can catch those who bring fentanyl into the system.

“The TSA just wants to do their job. They’re the largest screening agency,” said Mark N. Brown, who retired from the U.S. Secret Service in 2013 and is now a private security guard in Southern California.

He and others I interviewed say the new screening measures aren’t foolproof, and they can’t say if the TSA is watching everyone.

“I don’t like technology, but what I like is the human interaction,” Brown said. “That�

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