Obama’s Executive Actions on Immigration Aren’t a Blanket Amnesty

Ashanti debunks Irv Gotti’s ‘relationship’ claims: ‘He never tells the full story’ As President Obama was preparing to announce his executive actions on immigration in an hourlong address at the White House on Tuesday,…

Obama's Executive Actions on Immigration Aren't a Blanket Amnesty

Ashanti debunks Irv Gotti’s ‘relationship’ claims: ‘He never tells the full story’

As President Obama was preparing to announce his executive actions on immigration in an hourlong address at the White House on Tuesday, and as his chief of staff, and his former chief of staff, all of whom spoke publicly Tuesday, also backed away from the idea of a blanket amnesty for all illegal immigrants, we saw what appears to be the beginning of one of the biggest and most disturbing legal confrontations in the Obama presidency.

When the White House called a conference call to discuss the executive action, the topic of immigration came up. At the White House press briefing on Tuesday that followed, Chief of Staff Denis McDonough and former White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel spoke about Obama’s new immigration executive actions at the federal level. McDonough said the president had “moved away from his early, open-borders position,” Emanuel said the president had “moved away from his early, open-borders position.” That’s not accurate. Not when it comes to Obama’s executive actions.

Obama’s executive orders last month made it tougher for illegal immigrants to receive work permits and to stay in the country — but they did not create a blanket amnesty for them all. That was certainly McDonough’s position, too, but it wasn’t true.

As The Daily Caller’s Glenn Thrush reported on Twitter, Emanuel was actually describing McDonough’s remarks:

“They don’t have to make up anything,” Emanuel said. “They can make something up, all they have to do is say they don’t need it. I mean, the president is not — it is a very tough position but I don’t think that they need to make up anything.”

The two were talking about an executive order the president released as a way of “reforming” the way immigration authorities handle deportation cases, to make it harder for illegal immigrants to remain in the country. But on this, at least, Obama’s position was clear: He wanted to make it harder for illegal aliens to stay in the country, but he would not call for a “blanket amnesty” for everyone.

McDonough’s position was very different. Thrush reported:

Leave a Comment