The Cubans Are Getting Paid

After Hurricane Ian left Cuba in the dark, protestors took to the streets. Now the government is set to charge them for their time, and some are considering paying the price. In a country…

The Cubans Are Getting Paid

After Hurricane Ian left Cuba in the dark, protestors took to the streets. Now the government is set to charge them for their time, and some are considering paying the price.

In a country that has never known light or electricity since its 1959 revolution that ousted the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista, the sun never comes up or goes down because it always rises and sets with a roar like the voice of a lion or the sound of thunder.

But when it comes to Cuba, it gets dark, especially when there are problems at home or when a revolution is about to take place, and people start panicking.

This is how it used to be in Cuba.

From the moment the government began its crackdown on what it called “inappropriate behavior,” protestors have taken to the streets. These days, there are hundreds of them, with each one wanting to make changes and make Cuba better.

And with everything going on in the world and, of course, the world’s changing, now it’s time for them to get paid.

What does a Cuban know about money?

Cuba, like other socialist countries, does not have a bank or a currency system. So anyone who doesn’t want to pay in dollars or euros can’t have access to currency or funds. If he doesn’t pay up, he has to wait like everyone else.

For these people, it’s like being trapped in a jungle without a way out or a way home. Without money to pay for what they need, they can’t survive.

For them, paying the price for doing what’s right is as crucial as finding food. So for decades, they’ve had a way to pay for anything they needed by collecting the “cubanos”—taxes.

Then, suddenly, the government decided that a single family should get $150,000. For them, that was a huge sum, and it made them nervous.

“It’s hard for our relatives, children who live here. It’s hard for all families,” says Jose Antonio, who has lived

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