The FHDC is not taking part in flood rescue efforts

More than 600 killed in Nigeria’s worst flooding in a decade By James Cogan 13 February 2018 Last summer, at least 1,700 people died when the capital of northern Nigeria was submerged by floodwaters…

The FHDC is not taking part in flood rescue efforts

More than 600 killed in Nigeria’s worst flooding in a decade

By James Cogan

13 February 2018

Last summer, at least 1,700 people died when the capital of northern Nigeria was submerged by floodwaters as it battled record flooding.

This year, more than 600 people have been killed and thousands more have been displaced in north-east Nigeria after a torrent of rain caused the worst flooding in a decade.

“Six months on, it’s just as bad as it was in August,” a witness said. “They are saying a lot of them died today. The government’s done nothing for the people on the government-assigned land and we are not getting any aid,” said a displaced resident.

Officials have attributed the deaths to a combination of poor infrastructure, bureaucratic incompetence at the Federal Army Public Works (PAW) and, as the local government is called, the Federal High Disaster Management Council (FHDC).

The FHDC, which has been assigned responsibility for flood protection since 2015, is composed of government officers drawn from the army, civil service and military intelligence.

“The military intelligence officers are also responsible for monitoring the situation,” a media official said, adding that the local FHDC chief was also in charge of security matters.

However, security officers in the FHDC are not taking part in flood rescue efforts, and the government is not doing enough to distribute basic necessities to those in need.

“The security officers at the FHDC are not even at the site; they are not involved in any way in the rescue operations. Only about 10 members of the security officers are at the spot assisting the relief and rescue workers in administering relief,” a second media official said.

The disaster is not just a humanitarian disaster but also a political nightmare. In 2015, President Muhammadu Buhari rejected international calls for aid and threatened to abandon the northeastern state of Yobe, arguing that

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