The trial of a former University of Wisconsin police chief starts today

Prosecution rests in Wisconsin parade suspect’s trial The trial for a former University of Wisconsin Board of Regents member and former police chief accused of leading an effort to help a Wisconsin parade group…

The trial of a former University of Wisconsin police chief starts today

Prosecution rests in Wisconsin parade suspect’s trial

The trial for a former University of Wisconsin Board of Regents member and former police chief accused of leading an effort to help a Wisconsin parade group that was harassing and harassing the group’s members to make it harder for them to protest is starting today. The prosecution rests, and then the defense will take the stand.

The prosecution is relying on two weeks of surveillance and phone calls recordings obtained under a warrant.

The prosecution is also relying on statements from other members of the group, including one who was fired for complaining to the university about their “disrespectful actions.”

The defense is relying on the defense motion to suppress that said the officers involved lied, and the recordings the prosecution believes are inadmissible as they were seized in the course of an illegal search.

In an appearance in federal court on Thursday, the state’s attorney was asked for her reaction to the defense motion to suppress the recordings in police cars, as well as the statements of his former coworkers.

In an appearance on Friday and at the end of the prosecution’s final presentation, the defense will call witnesses to testify on their own behalf.

At the end of the prosecution’s final presentation, it plans calling a second witness from the University of Wisconsin Police Department to confirm the authenticity of the recordings it plans to play for the jury.

We are currently trying to find out why the prosecution plans to call as a witness the University of Wisconsin Police Department director at the time the recordings were taken and played for the jury.

In the opening arguments, the prosecutor argued that the defendant’s former police chief, and former University of Wisconsin Police Department director at the time, were lying when they claimed to have no knowledge of the political campaign to get supporters to wear T-shirts with slogans like “#StandWithUW” to a football game, in part because they knew students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison had been complaining.

“So, if you don’t want a federal agent listening to your phone calls when you talk to your husband’s sister who is concerned about her friend, would you allow the FBI agent or federal agent to go into your home and listen to your phone calls when you

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