The US’s Deportation Strategy Is a Bigger Thing Than You Think

New wave of migrants puts US and other countries to the test By Ed King 11 December 2014 US immigration authorities, who arrived in January, have deported an astounding 60 percent of Central American…

The US’s Deportation Strategy Is a Bigger Thing Than You Think

New wave of migrants puts US and other countries to the test

By Ed King

11 December 2014

US immigration authorities, who arrived in January, have deported an astounding 60 percent of Central American children who are detained pending deportation.

The US has thus far deported about 4,800 unaccompanied children, the vast majority from Honduras. About 800 of them are from Central America and have been detained by the Department of Homeland Security pending deportation. By the end of the month, about 70 of them will be deported, a figure which should be viewed in the context of the tens of thousands of others who are languishing in ICE detention centers around the country.

The numbers are of such colossal importance because of what they reveal about the extent to which US President Barack Obama, with his “immigration reform” of 2012, has shifted the terms of the debate to the right and given a green light to the deportation of millions of illegal immigrants.

The government’s new tactic, which has been underway for well over a decade, includes increasing deportations and expanding enforcement of immigration laws without the required congressional authorization and consent.

The current deportation numbers are not included in the official statistics of immigration offenses. These have been made more transparent in the past several months as the government has gradually released them.

The latest data from April 2014, the latest year for which data are available, reveal that, as of the end of May 2014, only 21,935 parents of children under the age of 18 were being taken into custody, with the majority of these being caught sneaking across the border as children.

By that date, the number of children being returned home to their parents had been dramatically reduced to 9,898 from a high of more than 14,000 in 2011.

In contrast, the numbers of immigrants arrested and/or deported have been rising.

Between 2010 and 2013, the figures show, more than 11,000 immigrants were arrested under immigration laws, with the majority of those being from Central America. During the same period

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