Those who don’t vote in the 2012 election say they don’t see the point

‘Pay’ for an endorsement? L.A.’s Democratic clubs under scrutiny this election LOS ANGELES – Despite the overwhelming public support for President Obama’s bid to become the first African-American commander in chief, some in Southern…

Those who don’t vote in the 2012 election say they don’t see the point

‘Pay’ for an endorsement? L.A.’s Democratic clubs under scrutiny this election

LOS ANGELES – Despite the overwhelming public support for President Obama’s bid to become the first African-American commander in chief, some in Southern California are still holding back support for his campaign.

A new USC poll finds that black voters are far less likely to back Obama than the public at large, but even so, his support among the minority community has remained steady over the years.

“I think he has a great chance, we just need more people who vote,” said Maria Fernandez, a community organizer in South Los Angeles. “He is a better choice than the other candidates because he is a better choice for the majority.”

Yet she has not voted in the 2012 election, saying she doesn’t feel qualified to cast a ballot in what she called a “disenfranchising” system that limits access to the ballot.

“I don’t see the point,” Fernandez said. “I don’t think it’s fair, like that’s the only option.”

Her point is echoed by many others who have opted not to cast a ballot.

“I’m just not going to vote,” said Eric Martinez, a teacher at San Jose City College. He worries that the candidates may have too different points of view and that he won’t get a chance to vote in the 2012 election.

“I guess I’m a little disappointed that there’s not more people who care about these issues, because I’m sure it would be a great election for democracy,” Martinez said.

Both Fernandez and Martinez said they will be voting in the special November election for Los Angeles County supervisor to replace Sen. Sheila Kuehl, who is retiring. But many say they will not vote because of the partisan divide.

Obama, in the Nov. 6 campaign for reelection to a third term, appears to be facing a tough battle for his seat. In recent surveys by both the USC and the Los Angeles Times, the president’s job approval rating is down from 49 percent in June to 42 percent now, while his race rating in the city has slipped from 69 percent to 69 percent. The president’s

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