What Are “Sick Days” and What Are They Not?

What Bosses Really Think About Returning to the Office In the past few years, employers have noticed a sharp uptick in “sick leave requests.” In fact, in a Q2 2017 survey from Mercer (a…

What Are “Sick Days” and What Are They Not?

What Bosses Really Think About Returning to the Office

In the past few years, employers have noticed a sharp uptick in “sick leave requests.” In fact, in a Q2 2017 survey from Mercer (a consulting firm), the number of sickness-related requests was up by a whopping 50 percent. Companies are also looking to hire those with the right mindset for their work environment as a way to attract and retain talent.

So when you have a sick day, what should you do? You simply don’t want to be a burden to your employer because of a personal medical issue.

But if you are suffering from a “sickness” such as an on-the-job injury, then it is critical to have the conversation with your employer about what “sick days” are and what they are not, so as not to risk losing your job or being fired.

But what exactly do employers mean by “sick days” really?

“Sick days” are days away from a job that your boss wants you to miss. They might be a week or more if you are a low pay employee or a senior employee and you feel you need to take a much needed vacation.

The only time you are excused from your job is when your employer determines that you need sick leave. That’s it. If your boss would like you to take a leave of absence as a way to reduce your work load, then he or she would need to tell you so at the beginning of the year.

Employers also use the term “sick leave” to describe days you are not working at your job, such as a day off you took as a result of family illness. But, employers do not really consider the value of that day off because there is no job for that day to fill, such as taking care of a parent or child or going on vacation with your loved ones. Instead, employers would simply tell you that “

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