Why Latinos Are Migrating to the United States

Op-Ed: Are Californians fleeing en masse to Texas? The reality is complicated, but the trend looks undeniable. After the state’s historic wildfires in 2017 — and again last night — questions are mounting about…

Why Latinos Are Migrating to the United States

Op-Ed: Are Californians fleeing en masse to Texas? The reality is complicated, but the trend looks undeniable.

After the state’s historic wildfires in 2017 — and again last night — questions are mounting about the future of the state’s economy.

When we published last summer about the dramatic trend of immigrants, including from California, moving to Texas, we anticipated that the two state would compete for immigrants.

While many people we interviewed in Texas had heard of California, they were unfamiliar with Southern California and did not know that the bulk of the 1,300 Mexican immigrants in Texas work in its agriculture industry.

It is also well-established that Latinos from California are migrating further north in the United States, where they hold more valuable jobs in agriculture and are well-educated.

In fact, the first Latino to ever win the Texas state lottery was born in Texas and raised in the San Fernando Valley, including in Imperial Beach, Orange County, and the San Diego area, according to immigration attorney Paul Bedard, who previously represented the family.

But the real question is, do all of these people really want to move elsewhere?

This report will explore the data, the psychology, and the economics of why some people leave California and want to live the American dream. Many are doing it because of their families.

These are the individuals who we will focus on in this report: the recent immigrants and asylum seekers who have fled economic misery and political turmoil in their home countries and who want to get back to their lives in the United States.

We are not suggesting that the problem is simply because of the weather. The problem also stems from political turmoil in their home countries. People are fleeing political upheaval both at home and in other countries, which has led to a spike in refugee and asylum applications. The economic uncertainty of living in a country without a clear future to come back to has also contributed to the growing trend.

How much could California’s population double in 40 years?

To understand these folks, we need to understand how California is changing and what life in southern California is like today.

First, let’s look at some simple demographics data from 2016 from the California Department of Social Services:

In 2016, there were 1,247,719 people living in the San Diego-Carlsbad-Imperial Counties, which includes the five counties surrounding San

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